Writing is a calling which may include failures.

‘I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.’ Phil. 4:13

If you are writing because you believe God has put that desire in you for a reason, will you still get rejections?

Of course! Is this horrible? Aggravating? Discouraging? It can be, but…

  • Failure is part of becoming a better writer…if you learn from it.
  • Failure is complete…if you stop writing. Therefore,
  • Failure is not defeat…if you keep writing.

Receiving rejection letters, listening to a hard-to-hear critique, or getting a scathing hand-written page-long rant on why your piece is not worthy to be published (yep, got one) are not what aspiring writers look for.

However! If you believe God has given you the desire to write, then writing requires obedience.

And obedience requires a dug-in, deeply-seeded decision to keep writing even when you don’t see the results you want.

  • Let your dog shred the rejection letter.
  • Review objectively a critique after grieving with a desire to learn.
  • Recognize that editors and readers are people with preferences and sciatic pain. This doesn’t make them bad people or you a terrible writer with no future in publishing.

Move Forward:

Write a one-sentence statement about what you want to remember when you have a failure in writing.

Example: Although I (state specifically what happened- rejection, sarcastic comment, etc.) and I don’t like it, I will keep writing because I (reason for writing, belief in calling, etc.).

Here’s one I’ve used:

Although I didn’t place in the writing contest and I wish I had, I will keep writing because I believe I can write, I need to write, and I want to write.

You can do this,

Robin

 

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